Proctor en Segovia: From Sierra to Sea

Posted by Proctor en Segovia

11/13/2018

We stepped off the bus and were immediately consumed by the Granada nightlife. Shortly after finding our hotel we were off to watch a Flamenco dance performance and eat dinner. The dance performance was entertaining (and surprising for many of us); the dancers displayed amazing footwork and emotion.

Proctor en Segovia explores Sacromonte and Albaicín neighborhoods of Granada. 


Filmed and edited by Campbell '20.

Proctor en Segovia watches a flamenco performance.

After watching the dancers, we ate a delicious three-course meal directly above the dance floor. Once we finished eating we all retreated back to our hotel to get a good night's sleep.

Proctor en Segovia enjoys the cuisine of Granada.

The next morning we ate breakfast in the hotel and worked on our history presentations for an hour. After our study hall we started on our walk to the barrios de Sacromonte and Albaicín. On the walk up we saw many houses carved into the the hill. When we reached the top we had an amazing view of Granada. We could clearly see from one side of the city to the other.

Proctor en Segovia explores Sacromonte and Albaicín neighborhoods of Granada.

Proctor en Segovia explores Sacromonte and Albaicín neighborhoods of Granada.

Proctor en Segovia explores Sacromonte and Albaicín neighborhoods of Granada.

Surrounding the city was a tall mountain range, the Sierra Nevada. In the afternoon we went to see the Alhambra (a Moorish fortress complex containing palaces and gardens, built on a plateau overlooking the Albaicín or old Islamic quarter of Granada). At the top, we entered the wall and learned about the history and art and architecture of the Alcazaba and Nasrid palace.

Proctor en Segovia visits the Alhambra.

Proctor en Segovia visits the Alhambra.

Proctor en Segovia visits the Alhambra.

Proctor en Segovia student history presentations in Granada.

After the history lesson we admired the views a little longer then headed back to the hotel to get ready for dinner. When we were ready for dinner we all went to eat sushi near our hotel on Plaza bib-Rambla.

Proctor en Segovia enjoys the cuisine of Granada.

After sushi we we walked back to the hotel feeling very full ready for bed. The next day we visited the cathedral and Capilla Real where Fernando of Aragón and Isabel of Castilla are buried. The cathedral has a breathtaking interior built in the Gothic style. After the cathedral we got the rental cars and headed southeast, through a pass in the Sierra Nevada, towards Almería province and the house we would be staying in for the the next couple days.

~ Levi '20

Proctor en Segovia visits the Capilla Real in Granada.

Proctor en Segovia visits the Capilla Real in Granada.

As we rolled up, we were stunned with amazement, excited to admire the beautiful house overlooking the quaint town on the Mediterranean beneath us. Immediately, the pool caught my eye as it was sitting in a perfect lookout spot. The rest of the house was stunning, with a modern “Greek” feel to it. After getting a feel for the house, we piled back into the cars and left for a small pizza shop in the town of Las Negras, Almería (Cabo de Gata). The pizza was magnificent and lit up my mouth with flavor. Later that night, we all ran out to the beach to admire the moonlit view. A few brave students were so intrigued by the night sky that they decided to sleep under the stars later that night.

Proctor en Segovia visits Cabo de Gata, Almeria.

The second day, we had the pleasure of visiting a world famous beach, Playa Monsul, that was used as one of the locations to film Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. The beach was spectacular, and we stayed to watch the most beautiful sunset I have ever seen. That night, Laura and about half of the group made amazing empanadillas (and tortilla española and salad) for dinner. Surprisingly, the group that had slept on the roof the previous night decided to do it again.

Proctor en Segovia visits Cabo de Gata, Almeria.

Proctor en Segovia visits Cabo de Gata, Almeria.

Proctor en Segovia visits Cabo de Gata, Almeria.

Proctor en Segovia visits Cabo de Gata, Almeria.

The last full day in the fantastic Cabo de Gata was a day full of excitement. First, we drove to a small town similar to the one our house was in. We walked from there about forty minutes on a narrow trail that led to a discreet beach in the middle of nowhere. At the beach, we had the opportunity to cliff jump and swim in the Mediterranean Sea. Later in the day we stopped at a small ranch and jumped onto some horses for a picturesque ride through a mountain valley. This was my highlight of the trip because it was my first time horseback riding. On the journey back to the house, our cars were hindered by a herd of crossing sheep. The next day we traveled back to Segovia to finish exams and projects and complete our term.

~ Ryan H. '20

Proctor en Segovia goes horseback riding.

 

 “Juana is the best.” Those four words are my most significant take away from Spain. For thirty years she has been taking Proctor students into her home. Cleaning, cooking, and even more cooking for three people a year, about ninety in total, in exchange only for company. Her iconic quote? “No gracias.” Amidst a sea of her kindness, giving thanks is against the rules because it is her pleasure to provide. This type of person is unique and remarkably rare, and, throughout my entire term, I have felt profoundly lucky to have so long to get to know her. The incredible conversations we’ve had, laughing over lack of understanding, playing cards, and discussing everything from the Franco regime to our favorite “Casa del Gran Hermano” competitors has made her a part of my life I could not forget if I tried. I am eternally grateful for letting me into her home and treating me as one of her own, and wish I had a way to adequately repay her for all she has done for me.

Proctor en Segovias students with their host families.

Proctor en Segovias students with their host families.

“Flipping through the pages of my journal, peering into the top right corner for the dates. Doing that feels about as long as this trip, flying by day to day, page to page,” reads an excerpt from my final entry. How I wish this book could go on forever, never reaching a blank page where I can see the journey has ended. However, as much as I want to stay, I know the inevitable end is what solidifies the value in my experience across the sea. I will always look back on these ten weeks with a smile, and hold my journal close on reminiscent nights.

Fifty-eight pages to summaries sixty-nine days in Spain. Not nearly enough.

~ Sam W. '19

Proctor en Segovias students with their host families.

Proctor en Segovias students in the metal arts studio with Jesús!

Check out more photos of Proctor en Segovia on Flickr!

    

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